Spotlight on Stars of Odd Man Out ~ Gregory Ashton & Luke Adamson

Odd Man Out runs at The Hope Theatre from 26 July to 12 August 2017, book tickets here: The Hope Theatre Box Office

Odd Man Out is composed of two plays, Rabbitskin written by Dominic Grace and performed by Luke Adamson, and Diary of a Welshcake written by Lesley Ross, performed by Gregory Ashton. Break A Leg caught up with both of the actors to find out what their pieces are all about.

Interview with Gregory Ashton:

Tell me about the piece and your character

Well it’s the story of a man escaping a bad relationship and re-inventing himself in Hong Kong. It’s a love story about cultural identity and finding out who you are, no matter how old you are. I play Ralph, who is a Welshman who sounds more Michael McIntyre than Michael Sheen: he is, I suppose, still trying to discover where he fits in, and he gets in to some pretty ridiculous scrapes along the way.

Was it easy to translate from page to stage?

I think so, but a lot of that has to do with Steve Marmion, the director. He was so careful in his handling of both me and the piece. We had worked together on the award winning Madam Butterfly’s Child so I really wanted to have him back as he puts me in a secure framework to just tell the story truthfully, which ultimately is all you can hope for as an actor

How does the space lend itself to the piece?

Well, I’ve been performing this all over the world for quite a few years now, and the spaces are constantly changing, but there is a unique challenge to performing on three sides… In many ways it is more immersive, which I love, but I also have to be constantly aware of how much I am including all sides, so it is always an adjustment. Then there is the throwing stuff… Will have to think hard about how that will work in the space. What I love about The Hope though, is it is so intimate, which hopefully will help draw the audience into Ralph’s world.

What would you say to encourage people to buy a ticket?

Well, firstly Luke Adamson is great, and I have read Rabbitskin so I can’t wait to see what he will bring to the piece.

I think people often shy away from one man shows and I understand that… but these two pieces are storytelling at it’s most engaging, so I’d say “come along, grab a drink and be transported for a couple of hours”. And of course… you may be lucky enough to be fed.

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Interview with Luke Adamson:

Tell me about the piece and your character…

Well Rabbitskin is a beautiful one man show written by Dominic Grace that came out of the new writing programme at The West Yorkshire playhouse a few years ago. It tells the story of Joe who grew up the youngest of five brothers in Leeds. Thanks to his wonderful father he develops a love for stories and literature and he can name his twenty favourite authors off the top of his head! Rabbitskin is Joe telling his story.

What was your initial impression of the script?

I loved it. Absolutely loved it. When I was first asked  to audition for it and read the script I just thought ‘this is so beautiful, I have to get this part’ luckily I did!

Was it easy to translate from page to stage?

The beautiful thing about monologue is that it is storytelling at its purest, it is one actor on a stage talking to an audience. Rabbitskin requires quite a lot of mime alongside the storytelling which is a wonderful challenge for me and really brings the world of the play alive with a beautiful simplicity.

Did you have any ideas about what you wanted to bring to the role?

Mainly I wanted to bring truth and honesty to the role along with an enthusiasm for the stories Joe tells. There’s also a great amount of humour in the script that I was keen to bring out.

How does the space lend itself to the piece?

The intimacy of The Hope is ideal for this piece. Being a single actor in that space talking to the audience, most of whom will be within touching distance, promises to be very special. It will draw the audience right into Joe’s world of magic, dragons, family and rabbits.

What would you say to encourage people to buy a ticket?

This is a double bill of beautifully written stories examining how these two characters fit into the world, at some point I’m sure we all wonder this! These wonderfully human stories will connect to something within all of us and ultimately provide an audience with a memorable night at the theatre.

Thanks to Luke and to Gregory, and as an extra special treat, we have the writer of Diary of a Welshcake, Lesley Ross, here’s what Lesley had to say about the piece…

Tell me about the piece and your inspiration for it

Well, there is always an element of the semi-autobiographical to my work, so many of the things that happen to Ralph have happened to me. I have always had an interesting connection to identity and where I fit in, so they are the themes I often come back to and when I first wrote the piece I was living in Hong Kong so culture and cultural identity were foremost in my mind. The weaving of the love story into Ralph’s journey was the hardest part because I wanted it to be truthful, even though it is uniquely odd. Of course nowadays there is much more talk of sexual fluidity so perhaps I was ahead of my time.

Was it easy to put it all down on paper?

Actually, yes, in this case it was. I mean, I spent months thinking about it, structuring it, finding the beats of comedy and pathos, but the actual writing was relatively quick. There was one major change in the show, which happened around the time we brought Steve Marmion on board and that was to reflect an older version of Ralph to accommodate an older actor playing the part. But that made Ralph’s story more interesting because there are many stories of younger people discovering themselves: it’s nice to explore those themes with someone slightly older; someone who may already know themselves in a lot of ways, but is still discovering new depths and opportunities for enlightenment.

Is it translating well from page to stage?

Well I hope so. I think, over the years, different audiences have responded to different things in the piece and that has often been directly connected to where the audience is from. I remember in one country a certain moment was seen as so shocking that there was this huge intake of breath, but that same moment usually gets a big laugh anywhere else. I find all that fascinating. And of course there is the “audience participation” moment, which always goes down well, but we could never have predicted that until we put it in front of an audience. That is why I love live theatre.

What do you hope the audience will take away from the production?

I hope that people go away with a sense of how with just one person and a few props, an entire world can be created! I love the Fringe… it is so important and proves that you can have an amazing night out for a lot less money! There is nothing more exciting than discovering a hidden gem, or a budding actor or director. But more importantly, if one person leaves that theatre and plans to be kinder to the next odd man out that they meet, well I will be satisfied

Finally, any advice for budding writers?

Write what you love to write about… and keep writing! The artist’s life is not a steady line but a mess of peaks and troughs… and I wouldn’t want to change that for a moment… so I just keep writing…

Huge thanks to Lesley – Break A Leg can’t wait to review Odd Man Out at The Hope on Saturday.

 

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