Odd Man Out ~ The Hope Theatre

Odd Man Out runs at The Hope Theatre until Saturday 12 August 2017 – book here: Odd Man Out Tickets

Star rating: *****

A double bill of monologues from writers; Dominic Grace and Lesley Ross, performed respectively by Luke Adamson and Gregory Ashton form the structure of Odd Man Out. Both plays are vastly different yet synchronise and almost meet in the middle, surprisingly well.

Rabbitskin (written by Dominic Grace) is a finely constructed piece narrated by the central character, Joe (Luke Adamson) who is a book-obsessed baby of the family and self-confessed lost soul. He focuses on specific moments in his life and how they make him feel – from washing up to sitting on the sofa with his dad and brother with whom there is a three year age gap. He’s the youngest of five brothers, all of whom he is intimidated and bullied by, his mum having passed away when he was young enough to have been left with the vaguest of memories of the lynchpin of the family. The bookish lad has to man up while his dad skins rabbits for their tea. The rabbit inspires reflections in Joe, (who is unable to switch his thoughts off unless he ‘floats’ outside of his body) putting death and the pointlessness of it to the forefront of his young mind. It seems that many life events in one so young have catalysed panic attacks and general poor mental health.

Luke Adamson is a revelation in the role, holding the audience to rapt attention as he portrays the boy who wouldn’t say boo to a goose, let alone a rabbit, then shocks with the ferocity in which he switches Joe’s emotions. Adamson offers a physical, engaging and intense performance which is not to be missed. The set, although basic, provides just enough of a backdrop to demonstrate emptiness, pointlessness and obsession. The lighting design also complements the piece superbly, enhancing the monologue at every turn.

With an ending which is both predictable and unpredictable in equal measure, too – this is a monologue which knows no bounds and it’s been brought to life innovatively and imaginatively.

(Review by Helen McWilliams)

 

Diary of a Welshcake, written by Lesley Ross and performed by Gregory Ashton, is an interactive, emotive and belly laugh inducing piece of theatre. If you were lucky, you were fed too! I thoroughly enjoyed my welshcake, thanks! Ashton instantly has the audience on side and tuned in to his story as he played the role of Ralph, the Welshman who would rather be called Tom and has an affinity with elephants. The piece offers a snapshot into Ralph’s life, the scene is set superbly as we are moved rapidly to a major life event for the non-welsh speaking Welshman.

A broken relationship inspires a decision to move to Hong Kong and teach English, so we are transported from the valleys to the orient where we are introduced to Fanny, Windy and Hymen (three of Ralph’s pupils). The puns are there for the taking and they pepper the script appropriately. The clever flipside being that homosexual welsh elephant, Ralph’s journey takes him to unexpected and often dark places – despite the vibrant characters who provide hilarity along the way.

The piece is intricately written, Lesley Ross has a gift for painting a picture with words and creating characters who spring to life in your imagination, courtesy of the precise narration. Ashton has a clever way of leading you to believe that Ralph is a soul who bounces back easily – therefore it comes as a surprise when he falls. The set offered everything we needed to see because the script itself showed us the real heart of the story, which shone through. Lighting also provided its own ‘scene changes’, reflecting the myriad of moods and atmospheres.

I’ve never had so much fun with a handful of Skittles (as in the sweets…) and I reiterate that I enjoyed that welshcake, theatre and food should go together more often!

(Review by Jen Franklin (Guest Reviewer))

 

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